Confessions of an Economic Hit Man John Perkins

Confessions of An Economic Hit Man by John Perkins is one insiders view of how the global empire has successfully created itself to keep the cycle of U.S. wealth, self serving. John Perkins has found the courage to share this dark past in hopes that it is not too late for us to change our dreams and re-shape with immediacy the future of this planet.

Those who express disdain or lack of evidence of this greedy global game have clearly missed the point.

John Perkins offers the reader an informative and enticing journey through the shifty ways of economic and political manipulation. Caught within the web himself, this book clearly calls attention to our individual responsibilities in our daily actions, no matter what we do or where we live.

What I find so courageous about this book is John Perkins had clearly shape shifted himself away from the greedy world of EHMs into a life of helping indigenous peoples in the world: specifically the Shuar of the Amazon. In unveiling these hidden dark truths, he is now fully owning his past actions. It is with this level of accountability that we are able to create new openings for global transformation.

John Perkins gives a first-hand account of a world in which US corporations wildly overpredict the growth that will follow big infrastructure projects in the developing world, convincing aid organizations to give big loans for these projects, resulting in big projects (and big money) for American firms and crippling debt for poor nations.

Part of the book tells of his own experiences, generating false predictions and both giving and receiving bribes. The other part is a history of the role that US corporations (and, more subtly, the US government) play in eliminating hostile but strategically important leaders of developing countries and co-opting their nations’ resources. (Those same leaders, hostile to US business, are often the champions of the poor in their countries.)

The history this book provides opened my eyes and made me want to read more on the subject. Thankfully, Perkins also provides extensive references for those who would like to read more on this, both providing an avenue for the curious reader and showing that he isn’t the only witness to the new imperialism.

Perkins spent the 1970s working as an economic planner for an international consulting firm, a job that took him to exotic locales like Indonesia and Panama, helping wealthy corporations exploit developing nations as, he claims, a not entirely unwitting front for the National Security Agency. He says he was trained early in his career by a glamorous older woman as one of many “economic hit men” advancing the cause of corporate hegemony.

Confessions of An Economic Hit Man by John Perkins is one insiders view of how the global empire has successfully created itself to keep the cycle of U.S. wealth, self serving. John Perkins has found the courage to share this dark past in hopes that it is not too late for us to change our dreams and re-shape with immediacy the future of this planet.

Those who express disdain or lack of evidence of this greedy global game have clearly missed the point.

John Perkins offers the reader an informative and enticing journey through the shifty ways of economic and political manipulation. Caught within the web himself, this book clearly calls attention to our individual responsibilities in our daily actions, no matter what we do or where we live.

What I find so courageous about this book is John Perkins had clearly shape shifted himself away from the greedy world of EHMs into a life of helping indigenous peoples in the world: specifically the Shuar of the Amazon. In unveiling these hidden dark truths, he is now fully owning his past actions. It is with this level of accountability that we are able to create new openings for global transformation.

John Perkins gives a first-hand account of a world in which US corporations wildly overpredict the growth that will follow big infrastructure projects in the developing world, convincing aid organizations to give big loans for these projects, resulting in big projects (and big money) for American firms and crippling debt for poor nations.

Part of the book tells of his own experiences, generating false predictions and both giving and receiving bribes. The other part is a history of the role that US corporations (and, more subtly, the US government) play in eliminating hostile but strategically important leaders of developing countries and co-opting their nations’ resources. (Those same leaders, hostile to US business, are often the champions of the poor in their countries.)

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